You’ve now read a summary (by no means exhaustive) of the arguments for and against using a blue-blocking tint in IOLs. So, is it a thumbs up or thumbs down? As you might have guessed from the first paragraph of the first post in this series, there is no straighforward answer.

Those who are strongly in favor of using a yellow tinted IOL cite the evidence supporting an association of macular degeneration with shorter-wavelength blue light while pointing out the lack of strong evidence supporting any disruption in sleep-wake cycles or notable detriment in color perception.

Those opposed to the use of a yellow tinted IOL cite the evidence supporting a disruption of sleep-wake cycles, and loss of night vision and color sensitivity with blue-blocking IOLs while pointing out the lack of strong evidence supporting a causal effect of blue light on the progression of macular degeneration.

The answer, clearly, is that we don’t know. So what is one to do? Most likely, if you have cataract surgery in the US you will have a blue-blocking IOL implanted in your eye as the Alcon AcrySof is the most commonly used IOL by US surgeons. If this bothers you then discuss it with your surgeon. If this all seems like much ado about nothing then I wouldn’t lose any sleep over it.

…or will you (pun intended)?

 © 2009 David Richardson, MD

Cataract Surgery Lens Choices

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